Warning: file_get_contents(http://casacommand.com/wp-admin/get-pano-tag-id-from-mfa.php?artid=84): failed to open stream: HTTP request failed! HTTP/1.1 404 Not Found in /home/myfavart/www/functions.php on line 1350
Luk 5 Pandava Keris dagger
Djiwo Diharjo
Art - Other
Physically, the kris is a form of dagger with a blade measuring between 15 and 50 centimetres long, sharp on both edges and tip, broader and asymmetric shape near the hilt, made of a combination of several kinds of metals.[7]:267 A kris's aesthetic value covers the dhapur (the form and design of the blade, with around 150 variants), the pamor (the pattern of metal alloy decoration on the blade, with around 60 variants), and tangguh referring to the age and origin of a kris.[8] This particular Kris has a carved wooden handle with a wooden sheath gilded in a soft metal, sporting a gold plated/jeweled handle base and gold figures along blade.
The kris or keris[n 1] in Indonesian languages and Malay spelling, is an Indonesian asymmetrical dagger with distinctive blade-patterning achieved through alternating laminations of iron and nickelous iron (pamor).[5] The kris is famous for its distinctive wavy blade, although many have straight blades as well. Keris is also a symbol of power and of ethnic pride[citation needed] in most communities making up the Malay Archipelago (currently Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, southern Thailand and southern Philippines). Kris is also one of the weapons commonly used in Pencak Silat martial art, which is also native to the region. Kris have been produced in many regions of Indonesia for centuries, but nowhere—although the island of Bali comes close—is the kris so embedded in a mutually-connected whole of ritual prescriptions and acts, ceremonies, mythical backgrounds and epic poetry as in Central Java.[6] As a result, in Indonesia the kris is commonly associated with Javanese culture, although other ethnicities are familiar with the weapon as part of their culture, such as the Balinese, Malays, Sundanese, Madurese, Banjar, Bugis, and Makassar. Today, kris is considered as a cultural masterpiece of Indonesia.[7]:266 A kris can be divided into three parts: blade (bilah or wilah), hilt (hulu), and sheath (warangka). These parts of the kris are objects of art, often carved in meticulous detail and made from various materials: metal, precious or rare types of wood, or gold or ivory. A kris's aesthetic value covers the dhapur (the form and design of the blade, with around 60 variants), the pamor (the pattern of metal alloy decoration on the blade, with around 250 variants), and tangguh referring to the age and origin of a kris.[8] Depending on the quality and historical value of the kris, it can fetch thousands of dollars or more. Both a weapon and spiritual object, kris are often considered to have an essence or presence, considered to possess magical powers, with some blades possessing good luck and others possessing bad.[8] Kris are used for display, as talismans with magical powers, weapons, a sanctified heirloom (pusaka), auxiliary equipment for court soldiers, an accessory for ceremonial dress, an indicator of social status, a symbol of heroism, etc.[8] Legendary kris that possess supernatural power and extraordinary ability were mentioned in traditional folktales, such as those of Empu Gandring, Taming Sari, and Setan Kober. In 2005, UNESCO gave the title Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity to the kris of Indonesia.[8] This weapon was also featured in the American bladesmithing competition, Forged in Fire (TV series)'s season 6 episode 7.[9] Kris were worn at special ceremonies, with heirloom blades being handed down through successive generations. Both men and women might wear them, though those for women are smaller. A rich spirituality and mythology developed around the weapon. Kris are used for display, as talismans with magical powers, weapons, sanctified heirloom, auxiliary equipment for court soldiers, as an accessory for ceremonial dress, an indicator of social status, a symbol of heroism, etc.[8] Barong dance performance with kris-wielding dancers and Rangda in Bali. In the Barong dance of Bali there is a segment called "keris dance", in which the villain Rangda magically enchants Airlangga's soldiers to commit suicide, while another magician makes them invulnerable to sharp objects. In a trance state, the male dancers stab themselves in the chest with their own kris but remain unhurt.[31] In Javanese culture the kris is revered as tosan aji (Javanese for "sacred heirloom weapon") and considered a pusaka. The kris is believed to have the ability to infuse bravery upon its holder: this property is known as piyandel in Javanese which means "to add self-confidence". The pusaka kris or kris-tipped spear given by a Javanese king to nobles or his subjects, was meant to symbolize the king's confidence bestowed upon the receiver and is considered a great honor. During the Javanese wedding ceremony, a kris is required to be adorned with chains of jasmine flower arrangement as an important part of Javanese groom's wedding costume. The addition of jasmine arrangement around the kris was meant as a symbol that a man should not easily be angry, cruel, fierce, too aggressive, tyrannical and abusive.[23] 19th-century studio portrait of a native Javanese warrior with an iron kris-tipped spear (a tombak) Kris-makers did more than forge the weapon, they carried out the old rituals which could infuse the blade with mystical powers. For this reason, kris are considered almost alive because they may be vessels of spirits, either good or evil. Legends tell of kris that could move of their own volition and killed individuals at will. Some kris are rumored to stand upright when their real names are called by their masters. It was said that some kris helped prevent fires, death, agricultural failure, and many other problems. Likewise, they could also bring fortune, such as bountiful harvests. Many of these beliefs were derived from the possession of different kris by different people. For example, there is a type of kris in Java that was called Beras Wutah, which was believed to grant its possessor an easy life without famine. This kris was mainly assigned to government officers who were paid, in whole or in part, with foodstuffs such as rice. There are several ways of testing whether a kris is lucky or not. A series of cuts on a leaf, based on blade width and other factors, could determine if a blade was good or bad. Also, if the owner slept with the blade under their pillow, the spirit of the kris would communicate with the owner via dream. If the owner had a bad dream, the blade was unlucky and had to be discarded, whereas if the owner had a good dream the dagger would bring good fortune. However, just because a blade was bad for one person didn't mean it would be bad for another. Harmony between the weapon and its owner was critical. Because some kris are considered sacred and believed to possess magical powers, specific rites needed to be completed to avoid calling down evil fates which is the reason warriors often made offerings to their kris at a shrine. There is also the belief that pointing a kris at someone means they will die soon, so silat practitioners precede their demonstrations by touching the points of the blades to the ground so as to neutralise this effect. The kris was purchased in Banyusumurup, a village southeast of Imogiri in Southern Central Java (about 35 minutes from Yogyakarta). The village has been developing since 1950s as central of keris accessories handicraft. Banyusumurup village produces warangka or keris seath functioning to hold the keris. This particular kris is called "Luk 5 Pandawa" ("Luk 5 Pandava"). It is believed that those who have this kris will be blessed by the five Pandavas. The Pandavas are the central characters of the longest Hindu epic Mahabharata who fought the Mahabharata War against their cousins Kauravas for the throne of Hastinapur in Kurukshetra. They were five brothers, namely Yudhishthira, Bhima, Arjuna, Nakula and Sahadeva, acknowledged as the sons of Pandu, the king of Hastinapur and his two wives Kunti and Madri.
Height:  19,     Width:  ,     Depth:  ,    
Banyusumurup, Java, Indonesia
Banyusumurup, Java, Indonesia
This particular Kris has a carved wooden handle with a wooden sheath gilded in a soft metal, sporting a gold plated/jeweled handle base and gold figures along blade. The making process of kris sheath is usually made from brass sheet. Almost the same as carving keris, the making of the sheath also uses very simple equipments namely hammers, carving nails, and the holding base from the asphalt. This process is less sophisticated than the process of making kris decoration since there is no raw material melting process. The brass sheet as the raw material is first made a plain sheath then soldering process is done. Next, to hold the case firmly for carving process, the plain kris sheath is attached to the surface of the base holder made from the melted asphalt. The carving process starts according to the motif to be made. After carving process, the kris case enters finishing step. In this step, the carvings on the sheath are brought out to contast by using an iron bar. To get brighter color, the case is polished with acidic substance. In the past, many craftsmen made use of lemon juice to brighten the color, but now more craftsmen use HCl substance for practical reason. The grip of this kris is made from Javanese Sandalwood, and the wooden part of the sheath is made from tamarind wood - Tamarindus indica. There are two main styles of the handles, namely Solo style that is bigger and curved and Yogyakarta style that is smaller. To get the expected handles, the wood is carved according to the prepared designs.
Djiwo Diharjo, the 19th descendant of Empu Ki Supadiyo from the Majapahit kingdom, was born on July 8 in 1935. He was a kris maker since 1956, and became the master craftsman, or "empu". Through his patience, perseverance and dedication, the works of the recipient of Upakarti Achievement Award 2011 from President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono have spread to collectors in various countries like Japan, Holland, the US, France, Belgium, Singapore, Malaysia, the Middle East, Suriname and Australia. Djiwo Diharjo, the primary school graduate, who was declared an empu by Yogyakarta Sultan Hamengkubuwono IX in 1984, mentioned the functions of kris that were also recognized by Westerners were bringing safety, fortune, inner peace, controlling rain and even counteracting black magic. As Djiwo Diharjo said, the crafting of kris with supernatural forces should be accompanied by certain rituals like making offerings, fasting, calculating auspicious dates and refraining from speech during the process of production. Djiwo Diharjo was convinced that the supernatural forces in kris come from God rather than evil spirits. He once noted: €"œThe time suitable for kris making is just two hours a day, which takes a long time to finish, leaving the rest of the day for prayer. A lot more time is needed for prayer than for crafting". Djiwo Diharjo passed away in 2016 and is still considered the best Javanese kris maker.