2

Introduction to

JFG Collection

Most of the pieces in this catalog sat in storage during my collecting years, 1988-2017, as I moved between residences, none of which had enough wall room for all my art. I spent a lot of time abroad, traveling, looking for art and adventure. It wasn’t until recently, 2019, that I was able to move into a house without enough room for all my art, and thus move everything out of storage and into my home. One of the miracles of this collection is that despite having been purchased all over the world, been shipped back to the US, and having sat in various different storage facilities for years, nothing was lost or seriously damaged.

While it may seem like fun to travel around the world buying art – and it was – the art collecting process is more complex; negotiating, shipping, insurance, hanging, lighting, storage, etc. All of these processes take time and money. A lot of time and a lot of money.

In the end, art collecting is really more a process than a final accumulation of objects. If you look at this catalog, you’ll see a lot of different types of art; but what I see is a series of stories; the story behind the acquisition; the place I was in, the people I was with, like the time my girlfriend had to return to the small town Indonesian town of Jepara to work out the shipping of a very large wood carving, which you can see on page X.

I have no idea what these art objects are worth to someone else. I know that they’re worth quite a bit to me, as a story of my life, and a record of the things I value. But more than anything else, art creates a contrast to the often ugly and irrational outside world. I love being able to control my own environment and being surrounded by beautiful things that make sense, and show the world at its best, and man at his best, creative self.

I bought my first real piece of art in 1988 when I had my first success in the real estate business, and I commissioned item 206; That same year I took a vacation to Bali to visit a friend from college. I spent two weeks there, had a great time, and bought many different art objects, all of which I still have, including another large painting, object X.

Over the years, whenever I traveled internationally, which was often, I looked for art. These trips lead to item X from a London trip in 1994, item X from Belize in 2009, and many items from Indonesia, where I spent a lot of time in 2016 and 2017.

I also looked for art in my home bases in the US, mainly the Washington DC area and Phoenix, where I lived for a number of years. Many of the pieces in my collection were purchased “off the rack”; a number of them, such as the first Gomph piece, were commissioned. Others I made myself, usually working with an assistant.

One of the things i enjoy most about the collection is that it includes a very wide variety of objects, and one of my goals as a collector is to find the many different and ingenious ways in which creative people find to express themselves; paintings and sculpture of course, but also clowns, jewelry, antique furniture, rare book bindings, jewelry of many types; the ways of expression are myriad and I enjoy them all.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

3

Introduction to

Introduction To Paintings

The collection includes 31 paintings; 7 were purchased in Indonesia; of those 5 in Bali and 2 from the same artist in Java. Most of the rest were made in the US, but often with subject matter of other places, such as Africa and China. There are also two paintings from India and one from Mexico. 9 of the paintings were purchased in my travels abroad.

The smallest painting was a gift from a friend. 3 were purchased by my mother, and one by my late brother. 9 might be described as contemporary in style, although the line between traditional and contemporary is very blurred in this collection. One (Serena and Tiger) was created by me in collaboration with an artist in New York. The piece by James Mathers and the portrait by Anna Shakeeva were commissioned.

There is no common theme, although animals of some type (horse, dog, giraffe, cow) feature prominently in many of the pieces. The sizes range from tiny (1646) to huge (1529, 1523, 1514). If there is any common theme at all it would probably be the vibrant use of color, hence my preference for acylics.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

4

Introduction to

Indonesia Painting And Bali

On my first trip to Indonesia in 1988 I bought paintings, wooden carvings, luggage, clothing, jewelry, a carved chess set, and more. I still have all those objects. That trip was just for a couple weeks, and mostly in Bali, but I also remember the locals starting at me in as I walked down the street in the little touristed city of Surabuya. At the time, there was one foreign tourist for every 14 that visits Indonesia now. I was visiting a friend from college Chris Kingsley, who, with his brother Clay, had started a teak based outdoor furniture company, Kingsley-Bate, which is still going strong. Chris was, and is, a charming, good looking man, but most importantly, he was living in Indonesia, and could give a visitor like me a visit that was unusual.

One of the unusual facets of this trip was that we stayed in Seminyak, in what at the time was a very nice small group of villas on the beach, Puri Ranh Bali, Almost 30 years later, while staying in Bali, I visited the iconic Potato Head Beach Club, site of a major hotel and well known restaurant and hip tourist hangout, little knowing at the time that it was built on the site of my the Puri Ranh villas.

In 2016 and 2017 i spent months in Indonesia with my girlfriend Septi, who had immigrated from Java to work in hotels in Bali. Once again, since she was an Indonesian native, I had access to people, especially in Java, that as a non indonesian speaking tourist would have been closed off to me. While modern Bali is overrun by tourists, most of those in the tourist industry speak just enough English to do their jobs; Indonesia is not Europe. And even though arts and crafts have been sold to tourists for many decades. the infrastucture is surprisingly weak. Generally, artists don't speak English, don't take credit cards and provide no help in shipping.

Balinese art is art of Hindu-Javanese origin that grew from the work of artisans of the Majapahit Kingdom, with their expansion to Bali in the late 14th century. From the sixteenth until the twentieth centuries, the village of Kamasan, Klungkung (East Bali), was the centre of classical Balinese art. During the first part of the twentieth century, new varieties of Balinese art developed. Since the late twentieth century, Ubud and its neighboring villages established a reputation as the center of Balinese art.

Ubud and Batuan are known for their paintings, Mas for their woodcarvings, Celuk for gold and silver smiths, and Batubulan for their stone carvings. Covarrubias[1] describes Balinese art as, “... a highly developed, although informal Baroque folk art that combines the peasant liveliness with the refinement of classicism of Hinduistic Java, but free of the conservative prejudice and with a new vitality fired by the exuberance of the demonic spirit of the tropical primitive”. Eiseman correctly pointed out that Balinese art is actually carved, painted, woven, and prepared into objects intended for everyday use rather than as object d ‘art.[2] Balinese paintings are notable for their highly vigorous yet refined, intricate art that resembles baroque folk art with tropical themes.

Prior to the 1920s, Balinese traditional paintings were mainly found what is now known as the Kamasan or Wayang style. These are visual presentation of narratives, especially of the Hindu-Javanese epics——the Ramayana and Mahabharata—— as well as a number of indigenous stories, such as the Malat, depicting Panji narratives.

These two-dimensional drawings are traditionally drawn on cloth or bark paper (Ulantaga or daluwang paper), and sometimes on wood, with natural dyes. The colouring is limited to available natural dyes: red from volcanic rocks, ochre, blue from indigo, and black from soot. In addition, the rendering of the figures and ornamentations must follow strictly prescribed rules, since they are mostly produced for religious articles and temple hangings. These paintings are produced collaboratively, and therefore mostly anonymously.

There were many experiments with new types of art by Balinese from the late nineteenth century onwards. These experiments were stimulated by access to new materials (western paper and imported inks and paint), and by the 1930s, new tourist markets stimulated many young Balinese to be involved in new types of art.

In the 1920s, with the arrival of many western artists, Bali became an artist enclave (as Tahiti was for Paul Gauguin) for avant-garde artists such as Walter Spies (German), Rudolf Bonnet (Dutch), Adrien-Jean Le Mayeur (Belgian), Arie Smit (Dutch) and Donald Friend (Australian) in more recent years.

On his first visit to Bali in 1930, the Mexican artist Miguel Covarrubias noted that local paintings served primarily religious or ceremonial functions. They were used as decorative cloths to be hung in temples and important houses, or as calendars to determine children’s horoscopes.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

5

Princesses of the Ocean

Painting

Artist Name : I Wayan (Kun) Adnyana
Seller City/Purchased Location : Ubud
Location Art was created : Indonesia,
Dimensions : Height: 160 cm, Width: 300 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

6

Painting

Description of Object :

This painting was inspired by the rise of Susi Pudjiastuti as the first female Minister of Marine Affairs and Fisheries of the Republic Indonesia in 2014. The artist portrays five ocean princesses or goddesses in a large jukung (Balinese fishing boat) in a shape of a giant fish. The princesses are dancing and are cheered, adored and welcomed by the fishermen at the seashore. Illegible scribbles, systematically and strategically placed throughout the composition are only for aesthetic purposes.

About the Artist:

“There are many great painters born in Bali, yet a painter who is also a writer, let alone a writer on fine arts, is a rarity. AKun stands tall among the contemporary figures, who will shape the future of Balinese culture. He is an intellectual who remains ‘Bali’,remains national, and increasingly global in his endeavors.”

Jean Couteau, Writer and Culture Observer quoted from the book "Nalar Rupa Perupa", 2007

BIOGRAPHY

I Wayan (Kun) Adnyana was born in Bangli, Bali in 1976. Currently, he is an associate Professor at the Fine Art and Design Faculty of ISI Denpasar. In 2015, Kun completed a PhD in Art Studies from the Indonesia Institute for the Arts in Yogyakarta.

Technique and Materials :

This large scale, multi-figurative composition is a fusion of painterly technique and modern text based mixed media work. The technical narrative of this piece employs a pallete knife painting technique to create background and atmosphere, brush application renders the form of the figurative elements, and fine tip pen scumbling is overlaid to unify the different visual aspects. Brush work is used to hand write the text within the piece.

Cultural Background / Genre :

On 16 September 2016, the World Wildlife Fund awarded the woman who inspired this painting as one of the Leaders for a Living Planet Award. This is in recognition for her efforts as Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries to champion a sustainable development in Indonesian fisheries, conservation of marine ecosystems, as well as her fierce crackdown on illegal fishing in Indonesian waters.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

7

Introduction to

Imron Syafi'I And Java

I purchased two paintings by this artist in a gallery in the small village of Kesongan, Jogja which was really devoted generally to ceramics.

The island of Java is radically different than Bali, although they are nearby and part of Indonesia. Java has far fewer tourists than Bali, and, whereas Bali has its own colorful brand of Hinduism, Java is overwhelmingly Muslim. You'll see very few veiled women in Bali; whereas not being veiled in Java is the exception. Like Bali, but much less appreciated by foreigners, Java has a deep and rich artistic heritage.

The paintings are both large and have a common colorful style, although different themes. My girlfriend and I had lunch with the artist to discuss the themes of the paintings. We also visited him in his home.

For 1528, Time is Money, the artist explained as follows: "Our life isn't long lasting, we always wrestle with our time. So don't waste your time, reach all of your dreams because time is money".

For 1529, A Gift from Motherland, the artist said the painting is about the anxiety and disappointment of motherland by seeing Indonesian lives shattered. The behavior of government officials who act in their own interests, and the accompanying corruption and nepotism makes the Indonesian nation grieve. Corruption of government officials is a common theme among Indonesian artists, although note that 1514 lauds the appointment of an effective official.

Number of 9 is a lucky number and by the Mother of the nation giving that number she is indicating that she wants to help the Indonesian nation rise up and be prosperous.


J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

8

Time is Money

Painting

Artist Name : Imron Syafi'i
Seller City/Purchased Location : Kesongan, Jogja
Dimensions : Height: 175 cm cm, Width: 145 cm cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

9

A Gift From Motherland

Painting

Artist Name : Imron Syafi'i
Seller City/Purchased Location : Kesongan, Jogja
Dimensions : Height: 200cm cm, Width: 200cm cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

10

Introduction to

Balinese Temples And Rituals

On his first visit to Bali in 1930, the Mexican artist Miguel Covarrubias noted that local paintings served primarily religious or ceremonial functions. They were used as decorative cloths to be hung in temples and important houses, or as calendars to determine children’s horoscopes

While the country of Indonesia follows Islam and then Christianity as the predominant religions, the island of Bali is 83% Hindu. This means that the Balinese people follow a lot of concepts prevalent in Hinduism, but in their own special way. A lot of Balinese festivals are thus built around Hindu traditions and beliefs, or the Balinese version of those beliefs.

An Odalan is a Balinese village temple festival in Indonesia. It is an occasion when the Hindu village community comes together, invite the gods to visit them for three or more days, perform religious services together offering refreshments and entertainment. It is a periodic event, one that celebrates Balinese Hindu heritage and performance arts. The Odalan celebrations are a social occasion among Indonesian Hindus, and have historically contributed to the rich tradition of theatre and Balinese dance forms.

An Odalan marks the founding of a particular Hindu temple, and is celebrated on its birthday according to the Pawukon – the 210 day Balinese calendar. Since Bali has thousands of Hindu temples, with at least three in each village, several Odalan are celebrated in some part of Bali almost everyday of the Gregorian calendar. The celebration rituals are called Dewa Yadnya (Sanskrit: Deva Yajna), includes processions, decorations of the village temple, entertainment and dancing in the temple courtyard, the village community pools its resources and observes it together.

The Odalan at a few large temples, such as the Pura Besakih - the biggest Hindu temple in Bali, has major cultural importance beyond its location. It is an island wide event, and therefore celebrated with major preparations once every 100 Balinese years.



Revel in the celebrations of Galungan & Kuningan

This may not be common knowledge but while the country of Indonesia follows Islam and then Christianity as the predominant religions, the island of Bali is 83% Hindu. This means that the Balinese people follow a lot of concepts prevalent in Hinduism and have a lot of festivals built around Hindu traditions and beliefs too.

One of these is Galungan and Kuningan. Much like the Hindu festivals of Diwali or Holi, Galungan marks the victory of Dharma over Adharma meaning the victory of honest duty and good over falsehood and an undutiful way of life.

The festival is usually celebrated in April and then again, in November. It begins on the Wednesday (Buda) of Dunggulan, the 11th week of the 210-day Pakuwon calendar, thus meaning there are two celebrations. It marks the time when the ancestors and their spirits visit Earth till the last day of the festival, which is called Kuningan when they leave again for their heavenly abode. The festival also honours the almighty creator of the Universe, Ida Sang Hyang Widhi.

According to local legends, Galungan commemorates a Balinese victory that involves Indra and the Balinese king Mayadenawa, who didn’t let his subjects follow Hinduism. The battle raged in Tampaksiring, Gianyar, where the king was defeated at last. The site where he is believed to have he bled to death is now the current-day site of the Tirta Empul Temple. The Balinese and Majapahit armies honoured Indra as their victorious lord, commemorating the defeat of the king as Galungan; signifying Dharma’s victory over Adharma.

In modern times, this festival is celebrated in a big manner with much splendor. The streets of Bali are beautifully decorated with coconut leaf, fruits and flower bedecked bamboo poles known as ‘penjor’ lining them on both sides. The festival traditionally involves the slaughtering of pigs for communal feasts and religious sacrifices, while other delicacies like rice cakes, satay, etc. are also prepared. During Galungan, a ceremony known as Ngelawang is performed in every village. Ngelawang is a ritual to expel all evil, which is performed by a “Barong”. The barong is invited into all the houses in the area as he makes his way through the village. The residents of the house pray before the barong who then gives them a piece of his fur as keepsake and to help dispel negativity from their home.

The Balinese people celebrate the festivities in brightly coloured costumes made of natural fibers. The Kebaya worn by women is traditionally white in colour and they wear vibrant sashes around their waists. But the festival is mainly associated with a triad of colours: red, white, and black referred to as Tri Datu. They represent the Hindu trinity of Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva. These colours are seen everywhere during the festival; on homes, temples, buildings and areas where related rituals take place. During the festival, the Balinese wear red, white and black coloured threads on their wrists, ankles and heads to impart physical and mental strength.


J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

11

Village Scene

Painting

Artist Name : Aarvis Dali
Dimensions : Height: 48 cm, Width: 72 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

12

Balinese Temple Ceremony

Painting

Artist Name : possibly: Ikt. Suja
Dimensions : Height: 45 cm, Width: 32 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

13

Name : Ubud Temple by I Nyoman Arnawa
Artist Name : I Nyoman Arnawa (Nawa)
Seller City/Purchased Location : Ubud, Gianyar, Bali
Location Art was created : Village Penestanan, Ubud, Gianyar, Bali
Dimensions : Height: 17.5 cm, Width: 18 cm

Name : Balinese Temple
Artist Name : Possibly: ImpSest
Location Art was created : Ubud, Bali
Dimensions : Height: 10 cm, Width: 8 cm

Name : Dance Painting

14

Introduction to

Indian Painting And Krishna

Indian painting is colorful and vibrant, and generally under appreciated. Like Indonesian art, much of Indian painting revolves around traditional mythological or religious stories and figures. Both of my Indian paintings are based on stories of Lord Krishna.

1518 depicts the tale of Radha Krishna & Bull. Painted in a full spectrum palette consisting of flesh tones, black and white, and high saturation chroma; the artwork is completed with intricate lines that have been imposed upon the figures to complete the narrative of the subject and add to the aesthetic quality of the piece. The line work, done in gold ink, depict a pattern like display of cows (golden cow), with one figure of Krishna found in the body of Radha.

71 is a vibrant and colorful painting of Krishna in the guise of the Fully Blossomed One. Krishna is characteristically depicted wearing a yellow dhoti (loincloth), a crown of peacock feathers while holding a flute and conch in each hand.

"Legend has it that when Lord Krishna slayed a mighty asura (demon) in the form of a bull, his consort Radha tersely told Krishna to wash off his sins by taking dips in various holy rivers. Krishna laughed it off and struck the ground with his foot whereupon the mighty rivers emerged, welled up and formed a kunda (little water body). Subsequently the Lord bathed in the water to please Radha. The kunda came to be called "Shyam-Kund"."

Krishna is one of the most recognized and popular Hindu deities. Krishna is worshipped as the eighth incarnation of the Hindu god Vishnu and as supreme god separately. As a Vishnu avatar, he is one of the most powerful, but also, he is the closest to the public. He is a central character in various Hindu philosophical, theological, and mythological texts such as the Mahabharata, the Bhagavata Purana, and the Bhagavad Gita (the song of the Lord).
The god is usually depicted as a handsome mysterious man with dark or blue complexion. The most common depiction of Krishna is as the divine lover, playing the flute while surrounded by adoring gopis (a herd of cows).

Another popular depiction of Krishna as the Fully Blossomed One. In this guise, Lord Krishna is shown as a cowherd, a legendary guru, an obedient and brilliant student, a great king, a protector, an ideal friend, a philosopher, an accomplished charioteer, a master flute player. In this depiction, he is regarded as the master of all, “Solah Kala Sampoorna” and “Poorna Purushottam.” Other depictions include him being as a mischievous child, a great leader, a legendary guru, an ideal friend, a brilliant student, and a master at communicating.

Common Krishna Symbols:
Conch- Represents the five elements (earth, air, fire, water, and aether) and eternity. It also alludes to him blowing his conch to signal the start of the battle of Kurukshetra and at the end to establish the victory of dharma (righteousness)
Discus (Sudarshana Chakra-: a symbol of the mind, can also refer to a wheel or force field
Mace (Kaumodaki Gada)- a symbol of strength and regarded as one of the strongest weapons for hand-to-hand combat
Lotus (kamal)- a symbol of the cosmos, represents purity and transcendence
Flute (murali)- symbolize divine music and a human heart free of worldly thoughts
Peacock feathers (mor pankh)- a symbol for beauty and knowledge

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

15

Lord Krishna Bamboo Painting

Painting

Seller City/Purchased Location : Bangalore India
Location Art was created : Kerala, India
Dimensions : Height: 59 cm, Width: 30 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

16

Radha Krishna & Bull

Painting

Artist Name : A.G.Nellagi
Seller City/Purchased Location : Mumbai
Location Art was created : India
Dimensions : Height: 36 cm, Width: 48 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

17

Introduction to

Vivienne Lee

The Wedding: A pastoral autumn scene, the bright reds and yellows set the back drop for the point of action within this self titled "wedding". Figures whisk through the landscape on bike, or on foot carrying flags, with a horse drawn carriage towing the newly wedded couple. A string of balloons painted in a a wide variety of hue further promote the festive occasion, and a small crowd gathers in encouragement as they pass. The pomp and glory of the moment are rendered with tender care, and the sentiment of this subject is accentuated by the high chroma color choice (a color palette that is typical of the artist's oeuvre).

The expressive brush stroke that renders the tree is indicative of the confident, painterly approach to creating works of art. Watercolor and Gouche are both water based mediums, with water color being true to its name: pigment and water, creating translucent effects. Gouche is water, pigment, and chalk binder; which allows the artist to create opaque layers.

The ancient city of Wu Nan: Full of whimsy and vibrant color, the fishing town is set to a backdrop of yellow sky, cotton candy clouds, kites, countless birds, and a dragon in the center of the sky. The residents below, nestled in a forested region with water to the left of the picture plane, seem to be enjoying the everyday tasks of life. One gets the impression that this idyllic village, it's beaches and and forests, are untouched by the woe of modernity.

Morning Traffic in China: This picture is predominately vibrant reds anchored by a bar of viridian at the bottom of the painting, and a thin strip of sky blue at the top. Upon a closer inspection, we see more than an abstract composition and realize that this work of art is a landscape full of figures all bustling on their way. An autumn scene, the figures all scurry from right to left in order to maximize the viewers interpretation of movement (traditionally, we read from left to right and visual communicators often deploy a strategy that works against that flow in order to accentuate movement).

All walks of life are present in the morning traffic. We see a pig herder, bicyclists, a moped, and a covered carriage as each individual whisks away to their designated lot.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

18

Morning Traffic in China

Painting

Artist Name : Vivienne Lee
Dimensions : Height: 28 cm, Width: 24 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

19

The Wedding

Painting

Artist Name : Vivienne Lee
Seller City/Purchased Location : King Street Art Fair
Location Art was created : US
Dimensions : Height: 20 cm, Width: 25 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

20

The Ancient City of Wu Nan

Painting

Artist Name : Vivienne Lee
Dimensions : Height: 32 cm, Width: 48 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

21

Introduction to

Mai Scannapieco

Mai is an old friend of mine, and an occasional amateur artist who has given me some of her miniature paintings.

In this case we show a series of abstract watercolors as well as one of my favorite pieces, i libri a la bella notte, a small pencil and watercolor in memory of my most excellent cat, Samantha, and some of my favorite books, on which the cat sits, including The Fountainhead, Pride and Prejudice, and Shogun. The scene is reminiscent of Van Gogh's Starry Night.


J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

22

Name : i libri a la bella notte
Artist Name : Mai Scannapieco
Dimensions : Height: 5 cm, Width: 7 cm

Name : Abstract Watercolor Series
Artist Name : Mai Scannapieco
Dimensions : Height: 7 cm, Width: 5 cm

23

Introduction to

Josh Brizuela

No Fear to Withhold: this imaginative work of art depicts a faceless child touching the nose (rather, coming face to face) with a wildly colorful beast of fantasy. With hundred of teeth and no less than ten eyes, it is unclear if this beast is a protector or a would-be attacker. As the title of the piece suggests there is "no remaining fear to withhold" and the viewer is left with an impression that the small heroin of this artwork has subdued her fears and transformed them into strength.

Hypnic Jerk: This playful acrylic painting features the portrait of a dog, or wolf, or fantastic monster (?) whose gaze meets the viewer with what seems to be curiosity in its highly rendered left eye and melting psychedelia in its right eye. It grins at us, revealing a set of deep red teeth with the inner mouth being a translucent blue.

As is common with this contemporary painters approach, paint is layered in what is traditionally known as "wedges" to create form. In some areas, the color wedges stack upon another to create an illusion of depth within the form. In other regions of this creature, a wedge of color will completely fall apart and begin to create a traffic jam of color dots and squiggle lines. There are area's of this creature's coat that blend color harmoniously (for example, from yellow to green to blue), and then there are other regions of the picture plane where harsh juxtaposition and discordant color scheme makes its case.

A free forming animal, the title and subject of this piece indicate a tongue-in-cheek approach to absurdity.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

24

No Remaining Fear to Withhold

Painting

Artist Name : Josh Brizuela
Location Art was created : Phoenix AZ
Dimensions : Height: 24 h cm, Width: 36 w cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

25

Hypnic Jerk

Painting

Artist Name : Josh Brizuela
Seller City/Purchased Location : Phoenix
Location Art was created : Phoenix AZ
Dimensions : Height: 10 cm, Width: 10 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

26

Introduction to

Mary Grainger

Mary was introduced to me by my mother who met her while living in Pheonix. Mary is a sculptor and painter who focused on colorful scenes of the Southwest. I have two paintings and one sculpture by Mary. One of the paintings was purchased by my mother, and the other by my brother and inherited by my mother.

Cityscape-d. This nocturne scene takes place in a valley and depicts a tightly clustered cityscape. The viewer (us) is perched on a mountain amid deep brush, looking down into the brightly colored city with the adjacent mountains and a deep purple sky on the horizon.

The oil painting's composition is structured in a way that focuses great amounts of high chroma and luminosity directly in the center of the picture plane. Darker and more neutralized colors on the edges of the painting create an sensation similar to that of a photographic vignette. The artists signature can be found on the top right of the work, painted in teal with the date '93 attached.

The piece is custom framed in wood that has been hand painted by the artist, stripes of green and purple color coordinate with the color palette of the painting.

The other piece is appropriately named Cliff Dwellers.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

27

Cityscape-d

Painting

Artist Name : Mary Grainger
Dimensions : Height: 48 cm, Width: 46 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

28

Cliff Dweller's

Painting

Artist Name : Mary Grainger
Seller City/Purchased Location : Phoenix
Location Art was created : Phoenix
Dimensions : Height: 48 cm, Width: 48 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

29

Manana

Painting

Artist Name : Ross Stefan
Dimensions : Height: 21 cm, Width: 24 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

30

Painting

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

31

Tianguis

Painting

Artist Name : Blanche Davidson
Location Art was created : Arizona
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

32

Painting

Description of Object :

This painting is influenced by the simple style of Mexican indigenous folk-art painting. The colorful work depicts a typical Mexican scene of a tianguis (an open-air market) with storefronts on the background and vendors gathered around a fountain in the middle. Some of the vendors illustrated are for traditional crafts such as ponchos, serapes, pottery, pinatas. Other vendors present are flower and fruit ones. The figures are all dressed in traditional garments, the males in predominantly white often wearing sombreros, and the females wearing colorful dresses with flower detail embroidery. The painting is signed on the lower-left portion of the composition. The back has a paper with the artist's details.

Cultural Background / Genre :

A tianguis is an open-air market or bazaar traditionally held on certain market days, usually the weekends, in a town or city neighborhood in Mexico and Central America. This bazaar tradition has its roots well into the pre-Hispanic period and continues in many cases essentially unchanged into the present day. The word tianguis comes from the Classical Nahuatl term tiyānquiztli. In rural areas, many traditional types of merchandise are still sold, such as agriculture supplies, products. However, modern, mass-produced goods are also sold. There are also specialty tianguis events for holidays such as Christmas as well as for particular types of items such as cars or art. A tianguis is similar to the American farmer’s market.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

33

Maggie's Pumpkin Pies

Painting

Artist Name : Christine Kennedy
Seller City/Purchased Location : Nellysford VA
Location Art was created : Charlottesville Virginia, US
Dimensions : Height: 37 cm, Width: 12 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

34

Painting

Description of Object :

A rural landscape rendered in water color, Maggie's Pumpkin Pies is a classic example of Americana Folk Art.

The farm to table experience has been tenderly illustrated, displaying a full-scale industry. A pumpkin patch in the background is the heart of this operation. Various buildings dot the scene and each one is assuredly an important aspect of the pie making profession. A brick front home, a classic country house, a storage unit, a horse stable, a bakery, and a classic farmer's market tent complete the romantic scene of farm life that is portrayed here. Various farm hands can be seen enjoying tasks such as walking dogs, picking pumpkins, and baking pies.

Black Stallions sprint across the page, some pulling open carts of the field's production, with other horses towing covered wagons that read "Maggie's Pumpkin Pies" on the side.

Technique and Materials :

The work was lightly sketched in pencil before the paper the inclusion of water color.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

35

In a Good Book

Painting

Artist Name : veronica barker-barzel
Dimensions : Height: 40 cm, Width: 20 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

36

Two Women

Painting

Artist Name : anonymous
Dimensions : Height: 18 cm, Width: 18 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

37

Painting

Description of Object :

The subject matter of this piece echoes the content found in the highly famous work "Olympia" by Claude Monet. If this work is indeed a homage to, or influenced by the work of Manet then we can make the association between Olympia's stylistic manner. Manet is often described as the progenitor of the artistic movement know as "Modernism" since his efforts helped the Western Aesthetic transition from Realism to Impressionism. With that said, we can group this unknown artist's effort in what is loosely coined by contemporary artistic circles as "Neo Primitive Mannerism" or "Neo Modernism".

Technique and Materials :

Gouche on paper

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

38

Abstract 1-d

Painting

Artist Name : Kaelyn Loes
Seller City/Purchased Location : Phoenix, Arizona
Location Art was created : Phoenix, Arizona
Dimensions : Height: 25 cm, Width: 20 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

39

Painting

Description of Object :

A contemporary whimsical painting of a girl walking while holding some type of fruit in her arms. Additionally, a giraffe, a bird with a long beak, and owl are pictured in the background. There is cursive text incorporated in the bottom right corner of the work. Text reads: Thine on Self Be True, possibly a reference to the famous quote from Shakespeare’s play, Hamlet: “to thine own self be true.” The overall style of the painting is a mixture of abstraction, expressionism, and with elements of cloisonné. Notably, change of values and details of the painting are illustrated with circular, oval, and rounded shapes. The overall palette is cool (variations of green, blue, and purple) with warm (red, orange, and yellow) accents.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

40

Introduction to

Anna Shakeeva

Russian born, but living and working at the Torpedo Factory in Old Town Alexandria, Anna has a distinct style and is probably the most talented artist within the Torpedo Factory complex.

Portrait of John F. Groom: This portrait of the patron, John F. Groom, is stylistically inline with the artist's oeuvre, providing example of the artists signature symbols and motif as it fuses together aspects of the sitter's world.

Mr. Groom's portrait is nestled in the middle of the painting, with various elements of his life, and elements from the artist's motif all around him.

John's cat "Samantha", girlfriend Flora (equipped with a flower crown), and his-half sister Caroline are significant figurative inclusions for the sitter. In addition to these personal elements, the artist has set the subject in a fantastic environment that includes a monkey reading a book on John's shoulder, a road that zig-zags until it disappears on the horizon, a chess board, and an architectural aspect that seems to reach towards the sky until it begins to morph into a constellation.

The palette deployed by the artist is soft and pastoral, with hints of cerulean in the cooler areas of the flesh. This surreal and delicate approach to portraiture is a staunch example of this artists work, who is celebrated globally.

A finished piece in it's own right, this mixed media print serves as a study for the finished work listed above, revealing some of the artists working methods from concept to finished form. This piece is primarily different from the commissioned portrait due to its lack of landscape and additional figures/architectural elements. In place of those missing elements are a swarm of yellow and black eyes floating around the subject that could also be interpreted as fireflies. The title of the piece stems from the small monkey reading a book, happily perched upon the subjects shoulder.

The portrait of the sitter is almost exactly the same in both print and painting. The speckles of cerulean blue in the cooler moments of the portrait have been further explored here, and the scarf that has been subdued in the final portrait is shown here as a brilliant vermilion or scarlet.

This print is mixed media due to small amounts of paint that have been included before its presentation to patron. This approach is commonly referred to as "hand-embellished print".

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

41

Name : Commissioned Portrait of John F. Groom
Artist Name : Anna Shakeeva
Seller City/Purchased Location : Alexandria, Virginia
Location Art was created : Torpedo Factory, Alexandria, VA, US
Dimensions : Height: 15 cm, Width: 15 cm

Name : The Book Of Life
Artist Name : Anna Shakeeva
Dimensions : Height: 18 cm, Width: 18 cm

42

Dirty Old Renaissance Man

Print

Artist Name : Anna shakeeva
Seller City/Purchased Location : Torpedo Factory
Location Art was created : Alexandria, Virginia, US
Dimensions : Height: 28 cm, Width: 28 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

43

Print

Description of Object :

A monotype print that separates itself from the other pieces that are in our collection by this artist. As the title suggests, "Dirty Old Renaissance Man" features an old codger that meets the viewers gaze with an unimpressed look. We are left to speculate the triumph and tragedy that this person has endured. Accompanied by a smiling woman, the Dirty Old Renaissance Man touches his hand with hers as if he were plucking a coin from the tax purse. With her breasts exposed, we are left to wonder if they are in transaction at a brothel.

Both of these individuals exude a dark romanticism and psychological charge that brings to mind classic novelists such as Dostoyevsky, Hawthorn, and Poe.

To further reinforce the mood of the subject, the artist uses a murky color palate of blacks, browns, blues, reds, and greens that mixed naturally upon the printing plate.In some areas, the artist is lifting ink away with a rag to create a soft sense of form. In other areas the artist is using a knife or small scribe to dig away at the material on the surface before pressing this one of a kind artwork through the printing press.

This work come framed and matted behind glass in a large cream mat closed with a thin silver frame.

*Poem: This artwork was featured in the 2004 Artomatic group show that is held semi-annually in the DMV region. As is tradition at Artomatic, poets will select particular works of art and create a poem based upon the selected piece. The poet "Brash" had selected this work, and the poem can be found on a note attached to the back side of the framed work of art.

Technique and Materials :

Monotyping is a type of printmaking made by drawing or painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface. The surface, or matrix, was historically a copper etching plate, but in contemporary work it can vary from zinc or glass to acrylic glass. The image is then transferred onto a sheet of paper by pressing the two together, usually using a printing-press. Monotypes can also be created by inking an entire surface and then, using brushes or rags, removing ink to create a subtractive image, e.g. creating lights from a field of opaque colour. The inks used may be oil based or water based. With oil based inks, the paper may be dry, in which case the image has more contrast, or the paper may be damp, in which case the image has a 10 percent greater range of tones.

Monotyping produces a unique print, or monotype; most of the ink is removed during the initial pressing. Although subsequent reprintings are sometimes possible, they differ greatly from the first print and are generally considered inferior. These prints from the original plate are called "ghost prints." A print made by pressing a new print onto another surface, effectively making the print into a plate, is called a "cognate". Stencils, watercolor, solvents, brushes, and other tools are often used to embellish a monotype print. Monotypes can be spontaneously executed and with no previous sketch.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

44

Spring

Print

Artist Name : anna shakeeva
Seller City/Purchased Location : Torpedo Factory
Location Art was created : Alexandria, Virginia, US
Dimensions : Height: 30 cm, Width: 40 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

45

Print

Description of Object :

This limited edition prints (4/45) titled "Spring" is a firm display of the artist's style and motif.

Set in a yellow frame that is embossed with green trim, "Spring" depicts a woman in communion with nature. The sapling-green trim of the frame is one of the darkest tones of the entire object (save for the subject's brown hair, and the deep indigo of the bird resting on her shoulder). Her dress is either patterned in floral print, or it is entirely crafted of greenery. The highly detailed lace garment under her dress may very well be made of clouds, or perhaps pearls.

Sitting upon her head, as if it were a crown, is a pastoral bouquet of flowers of numerous species.with portraits of fairies poking out between the flora. The bouquet is not overly arranged, rather, it flows wildly (like her hair) as bramble naturally will. There are butterflies whisping around adding an element of suspended animation to the movement of the composition. In the subjects hand is a small flower, different in design from the rest of the floral elements of this pieces. She holds it as if showing the viewer a discovery, or perhaps as an offering.

The landscape behind our subject is light in tone. In the middle-ground of the picture there are two pink budded trees that flank the figure. In front of the tree on the right exists a 3 storied building that models itself after the small religious chapels of the Old World.

Behind the middle ground there is a mountain that is so light in tone that it could be overlooked. The space finalizes itself with a yellow hued sky, and poking out from the very top of the picture plane are 3 small figures hanging upside down, suggestive of angels or other-wordly beings.

Frame By Bill $682 + tax

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

46

Serena and Tiger

Collage

Artist Name : John F. Groom and Adam Aharon
Seller City/Purchased Location : New York, NY
Location Art was created : New York, NY
Dimensions : Height: 33 cm, Width: 33 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

47

Collage

Description of Object :

This pop-art style collage, developed by John Groom and executed by Adam Aharon, presents a commentary on the crass commercialization of modern American sports.

Prominently featured in the center of the work are US sports legends, Serena Williams and Tiger Woods (‘Serena and Tiger’ of the title), alongside smaller figures of other athletes, all of which are placed on a background filled with dollar signs. A text bubble coming out of William’s mouth reads: “I swear to God, I’m going to take this fucking product [the word ‘product’ replacing ‘ball’] and shove it down your fucking throat!”, a simple sentence that encapsulates the main theme of the work, namely, the shift in value from sports proper (ie. the ball) to extreme commercialization and advertising trends that have more and more become an integral part of modern day sports. Branded content is found everywhere on the figures: everybody is wearing Nike caps, Tiger Woods is advertising Gillette on his golf club and wearing heavy bling jewelry, while Williams is (paradoxically) promoting Nike sports apparel while wearing a big Puma chain and McDonalds earrings. And while every figure on the piece is in some way related to their main profession - sports - and are also dressed accordingly, we can spot a young David Beckham modeling for Armani underwear above Tiger Woods. Gatorade, Adidas, Wilson rackets and cell phones are also featured as commercial products. But product placement and endorsement deals aren’t the only targets of the critique here: Wood’s figure is covered with excerpts from tabloid magazines with cover stories of his cheating scandals. This highlights a new dimension of ‘being’ a celebrity athlete in the era of mass-media, whereby one’s work performance is no longer central to their fame and recognition and instead, their private life (as exposed through the tabloids) becomes inseparable from their sport identity and talent.

Cultural Background / Genre :

Concept by John Groom, which he developed with Adam Aharon, who had done some tee shirts and other graphic work for him. The work was done in Brooklyn by Aharon with direction from Groom. Then another Brooklyn artist with whom Groom was working, Alex Doig, shipped the work from Brooklyn to Groom in Alexandria, where it was finished by Groom and his assistant Karlyshiana Loaiza, who became a well-known musician with the stage name of Kali Uchis. Groom and Loaiza applied the dollar fringe border in Alexandria in 2012.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

48

Summer room number 1

Painting

Artist Name : Nick Kosciuk
Seller City/Purchased Location : Phoenix, Arizona
Dimensions : Height: 30 cm, Width: 24 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

49

Painting

Description of Object :

I bought this painting because its a touching image, but also because it reminds me of what several of my girlfriends might have looked like as children.

Painted in oils, this scene depicts an interior with a young orphaned girl seated in a chair. The room is plain, the artist's palette is limited. The seated girl waits near a window, the only other element in the picture is a tree. The unnamed girl's dress is rendered in the primary color blue with dots of yellow, the tree being painted in a mixture of this yellow and blue speaks to the artist's sense of poetry in an otherwise bleak interior space.

Kosciuk's motif of depicting these young women from this particular region of the world ( Belarus) is on display, with this subject being something the artist continues to explore throughout the course of his career.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

50

The Hidden IMAM Calling up the Archetypes

Painting

Artist Name : James Mathers
Seller City/Purchased Location : Abbot Kinney BLVD Venice California
Dimensions : Height: 24 cm, Width: 18 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

51

Painting

Description of Object :

A private commission for Mr. Groom. This piece features the Christian angel Gabrielle, sounding the trumpet and call up various archetypes, including Mr. Groom's cat.

The artist is known for using non-conventional materials within his work. In this case, blue glitter is used to represent Gabriel, otherwise labeled as "the hidden Imam". The piece is created on cradled MDF panel.

To achieve this work, the artist would paint in major elements using acrylic. Once that dried, the artist laid the piece flat on the ground or table, and then used glue to create a shape that would represent Gabrielle. While the glue blob was wet, the artist sprinkled the entire area with blue glitter, he then used the back of a paint brush to dig out elements that need extra emphasis, such as the figures arms. he would then walk away from the piece and return when it was dry and sweep away any excess glitter material.

A highly eclectic artist known for his influence in cinema as much as he is known for community building, craft, and story board... this piece is a fine example of the american branch of "Neo-Expressionism"

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

52

The Crucifixion

Painting

Artist Name : Blake Hughes
Seller City/Purchased Location : Alexandria
Location Art was created : Grad School
Dimensions : Height: 60 cm, Width: 60 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

53

Painting

Description of Object :

Description from the Artist:

A large scale experimental piece that I began in my last days of undergraduate and finished a few months later when, The Crucifixion... is my interpretation of the moment after Longinus pierces Christ’s side and confirms his death. With this I wanted to incorporate various elements of popular culture retelling of the story, purposefully positioning Mother Mary and a pregnant Mary Magdalene front and center to imply the greater connection the two women had to Christ than any of his male apostles, 13 of whom bicker, weep, and plot in the background. Using the traditional colors associated with each Mary I hoped to draw a connection to the closest apostle, glad in yellow to complete the color trinity and bathed in light is Judas, and furthest away holding the keys to heaven is Peter, both positioned to spin the traditional notion of the Crucifixion.

Additional: This 4'x4' canvas is set in a beveled and embossed frame that has been painted black. The work is signed and dated by the artist in the bottom right hand corner.

The work juxtaposes a swirl of dark neutral tones that imply a landscape, coupled with the high saturation of the figures contained within the piece. The pairing of dark and muddied colors nestled against vibrant hues accentuates both. Thinking in terms of music, this would be the equivalent of harmony between bass and treble.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

54

Introduction to

Ashley Macias

Ashley is a Phoenix based artist whose work I encountered while living in Phoenix. She has a distinctive dramatic style. I own two of her paintings, very different works but stylistically similar.

“My art is always about exploring deeper consciousness, the human psyche and human nature. I always try to portray this. I want to create the human element through plants, through, well, everything that exists, but also create this very deep construct of what goes beyond the human mind. What’s underneath; what really defines us as living things and how beneath it all, we are all part of that same origin, that same beauty.” (Macias, Java Magazine)

In "Three" In this work, using the natural world (wood) as backdrop, Macias creates a spiritual conflict of the human figures that plays out in this psychedelic scene. Reminiscent of the surrealist work of Francis Bacon, the position of the figures in this fluid natural world is defined through strict geometric shapes - two black triangles, the so-called “space-frames”. In painting and drawing, these are a structural device used to construct an environment of the figures that doesn´t clarify spatial relations and in this way maintains the ambiguity of space. Such limitation of pictorial space draws a strict boundary between the “inside” and “outside”, the latter here the background of the world/nature (wood) and the former a moment, strictly defined by space, where the psychological conflict between the three figures plays out. The figures literally seem to be emerging - the leg of the figure on the right looks like it is stepping out of water - out of the abstract background space into one of action.

The painting is full of eyes, a common feature in Macias´s work - “I always start with the eye… the window to the soul… I’ll float three eyes on the page, a triangle. They act as the focal point or guide” (Macias, interview with Phoenix Magazine). In fact, if (as per her words), the three most prominent eyes on this work - on the hips of the figures, one on each - are connected into a triangle, they form another such “space-frame” that aligns with one of the perspectives inscribed in the image - *there is two lines of perspective in this work: one of the vanishing points is located along the left side of the imaginary triangle between the three figures, and the other follows the direction of the black triangle on the bottom. In this way, the process of vision is here very much emphasized, not only because of the prominence of the symbolism of the eyes, but also because the work semantically brings to mind this tradition of perspective that chiefly concerned itself with pictorial vision, ie. “how” we see into a painting and “how” our minds construct its space. In this case, the vision goes beyond mere illusionistic spatial construction - as the perspective of a rational space is here clearly not the chief concern, but rather, a deeper vision into what goes inside the external facade of (human) life.

Macias´s preoccupation with the inner life of human consciousness can be further seen in her treatment of the human figures. She intensely draws lines and pulses of vibrations on the human bodies that (externally) reflect the inner life of the human psyche.

In Macias Bird, A surreal figure with a gaze fixed on nature, devoid of a landscape, is the subject in this contemporary painting. A turquoise background is all the atmosphere the artist provided for this humanoid creature. The figure clutches a nest of some sort, with an eyeball that pushes out from the top of the birds home. A bird painted in red, yellow, and blue is suspended in flight right above it's nest as if comes face to face with the humanoid.

A painterly approach has been deployed in this work, with colors that mix and swirl directly on the canvas, giving the impression to a trained eye that the artist "discovered" this work just as much as they planned it out.

J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

55

Three

Painting

Artist Name : Ashley Macias
Seller City/Purchased Location : Phoenix, AZ
Location Art was created : Phoenix, AZ
Dimensions : Height: 23 cm, Width: 23 cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection

56

Macias Bird

Painting

Artist Name : Ashley Macias
Seller City/Purchased Location : Phoenix AZ
Dimensions : Height: 4' cm, Width: 4' cm
J. F. Groom’s Art Collection